Author: Rose H. Robbins

What are the Requirements for a Battered Spouse to be Eligible for a Green Card under Violence Against Women Act – VAWA in 2014?

Call (954) 946-8130 to find out about the legal services we offer in the area of VAWA law. We do not offer a free consultation with an attorney and there is a charge for a legal consultation depending on the complexity of the matter.

As a battered spouse, you may file an immigrant visa petition under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended by the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

The VAWA provisions in the INA allow certain spouses of U.S. citizens and certain spouses of permanent residents (Green Card holders) to file a petition for themselves, without the abuser’s knowledge. This allows victims to seek both safety and independence from their abuser, who is not notified about the filing.

Which Battered Spouses are Eligible to File under VAWA?

You may file for yourself if you are, or were, the abused spouse of a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. You may also file as an abused spouse if your child has been abused by your U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse. You may also include on your petition your unmarried children who are under 21 if they have not filed for themselves.

What are the Eligibility Requirements for a Spouse to File under VAWA?

A) Qualifying spousal relationship:

You are married to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident abuser or

your marriage to the abuser was terminated by death or a divorce (related to the abuse) within the 2 years prior to filing your petition, or

your spouse lost or renounced citizenship or permanent resident status within the 2 years prior to filing your petition due to an incident of domestic violence, or

you believed that you were legally married to your abusive U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse but the marriage was not legitimate solely because of the bigamy of your abusive spouse.

B) You have suffered battery/extreme cruelty by your U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse:

You have been abused by your U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse, or

your child has been subjected to battery or extreme cruelty by your U.S. or permanent resident spouse.

C) You entered into the marriage in good faith, not solely for immigration benefits.

D) You have resided with your spouse.

E) You are a person of good moral character.

What is the Filing Process under VAWA?

You must complete the Form I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant, including all supporting documentation.

If you are living abroad at the time of filing the self-petition, you may file Form I-360 if:

the abuser is an employee of the U.S. government,

the abuser is a member of the uniformed services, or

you were subjected to battery or extreme cruelty in the United States.

If you are a self-petitioning spouse or child and you meet all filing requirements, you will receive a notice (Prima Facie Determination Notice) valid for 150 days that you can present to government agencies that provide certain public benefits to certain victims of domestic violence.

If your Form I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant is approved and you do not have legal immigration status in the United States, USCIS usually will place you in deferred action, which allows you to remain in the United States

Can I Work in the United States during the VAWA processing?

If you have an approved Form I-360, you are eligible to apply to work in the United States. In addition, if you have an approved Form I-360 and have been placed in deferred action, you are eligible to apply to work in the United States.

Am I Eligible for a Permanent Residence (Green Card)?

If you have an approved Form I-360, you may be eligible to file for a green card. If you are a self-petitioning spouse or child, your children listed on your approved Form I-360 may also be eligible to apply for a green card. It is important to work with an immigration attorney  who is experienced with VAWA filings to help you assemble the required information and documentation.

 

We look forward to hearing from you. There is no charge for an initial telephone consultation. The Law Office of Rose H. Robbins represents VAWA immigration clients from all over the United States since it involves the same Federal laws and regulations.

Please call us at: (954) 946-8130 to schedule your free telephone consultation so we can tell you about the legal services we offer in this area.

CONTACT THE OFFICE HERE!

We look forward to hearing from you!

 

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What is a Prima Facie Case for Self-Petitioner under Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”)?

Legislative Background of the Prima Facie Case

     In 1996, Congress enacted legislation that affects the ability of most aliens to receive public assistance. In the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), Congress mandated that only “qualified aliens,” as defined by statute, were eligible for public assistance. Section 501 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA), amended the definition of “qualified alien” to include battered aliens, including certain aliens who file or have approved self-petitions. This “qualified alien” status is afforded not only to aliens with approved self-petitions, but also to those who file a self-petition which establishes a prima facie case for immigrant classification.

 Purpose of Establishing a Prima Facie Case

     USCIS (“Service”) adjudicates the Form I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er) or Special Immigrant, and issues a notice of approval to those self-petitioning spouses and children who demonstrate eligibility. Upon approval of the self-petition, the applicant is a “qualified alien” for purposes of the PRWORA. Often, however, the initial submission does not comply with all of evidentiary burdens required for the Service to adjudicate the self-petition. In such cases, pursuant to Service regulations, self-petitioners are generally sent a request for evidence which sets forth the deficiencies of the application and allows the applicant 60 days in which to submit supplemental documentation. The applicant may be granted an additional 60 days at the discretion of the Service pursuant to current regulations.

           However, because battered aliens can be “qualified aliens” without approval of the petition, the Service must also evaluate the petition and the evidence submitted in support of the petition to determine if the alien has established a prima facie case. Although the statute affords benefits to those who establish prima facie eligibility, neither the statute nor the legislative history adequately details the requirements for establishing this eligibility. Conventional dictionary definitions are of little assistance in this regard. Without standards, determinations could be made inconsistently and with varying constancy to Congressional intent, which would be detrimental to the purpose of the statute and to the individual petitioner trying to meet it.

Requirements for Demonstrating a Prima Facie Case

    The prima facie determination will be made only after a self-petition has been filed with the Service, and the decision to issue that Notice of Prima Facie Case (Notice) rests solely with the Service. In evaluating whether a self-petitioner has established a prima facie case, the Service must have evidence of each of the required elements of the self-petition as detailed in Service regulations at § 204.2(c)(1) and (e)(1). Accordingly, self-petitioners should submit Form I-360 and credible relevant evidence in support of the petition addressing each of the statutory elements:  (1) existence of the qualifying relationship; (2) the citizenship or immigration status of the abuser; (3) the self-petitioner’s eligibility for immigrant classification; (4) residence in the United States; (5) evidence that, during the qualifying relationship, the petitioner and abuser resided together in the United for some unspecified period of time; (6) battery or extreme cruelty ; (7) good moral character; (8) extreme hardship; and (9) in the case of a self-petitioning spouse, good faith marriage. The elements and evidentiary requirements are set forth in 8 CFR § 204.2(c)(1) and (e)(1).

    If the Service determines that a petitioner has demonstrated prima facie eligibility, a Notice of Prima Facie Case will be issued. The Notice is neither a benefit nor immigration status in its own right, and an applicant cannot apply solely for a Notice of Prima Facie Case. The decision to issue such a notice rests solely with the Service. Applicants are encouraged to submit full documentation at the earliest possible time. However, bona fide candidates for self-petitioning should not postpone filing the petition because they are unable to immediately comply with all of the regulatory requirements.

    The Service’s decision to issue or not to issue a Notice will not be a factor in the adjudication of the underlying petition, nor will it constitute a binding determination of the credibility of the evidence submitted. Prima facie evidence will not always fully or completely satisfy the evidentiary burdens, and may be contradicted by evidence, documentation, or affidavits (or any other credible evidence) which come to the attention of the Service after a favorable prima facie determination has been made. Self-petitioners should be aware that such situations may result in the denial of the I-360 petition, even if a favorable prima facie determination was initially made. Conversely, the Service’s decision not to issue the Notice of Prima Facie Case is not fatal to the underlying petition.

    The prima facie evaluation will consist of an initial review of the Form I-360 and the supporting documentation. Applicants who set forth a prima facie case will receive a Notice of Prima Facie Case to document their “qualified alien” status for public benefits. The Notice is valid until the Service has adjudicated the petition. At present, the Service intends to issue the Notice with a validity period of 150 days, which exceeds the time required for adjudication in the majority of these cases. In those few cases when the Service is unable to complete the adjudication within the 150-day period, the applicant will be able to request an extension pursuant to the instructions on the Notice. Because the Notice is intended solely for the purpose of enabling petitioners to apply for public benefits within the United States, the Service will only issue the Notice to petitioners residing in the United States.

We look forward to hearing from you and discussing your case. There is no charge for an initial telephone consultation. The Law Office of Rose H. Robbins represents VAWA immigration clients from all over the United States since it involves the same Federal laws and regulations.

The Law Offices of Rose H. Robbins represents clients all over the United States and all over the world.

Call (954) 946-8130 to find out about the legal services we offer in the area of VAWA law. We do not offer a free consultation with an attorney and there is a charge for a legal consultation depending on the complexity of the matter.

INFORMATION ONLINE FORM!

* Major Florida Cities We Serve

Boca Raton Cape Coral Clearwater Deerfield Beach Ft. Lauderdale  Gainesville Hialeah Hollywood Jacksonville Lighthouse Point Miami  Miami Beach Orlando Pompano Beach Port St. Lucie St. Petersburg Tallahassee Tampa West Palm Beach

* Major Florida Counties We Serve

Broward County Duval County Hillsborough County Miami-Dade County Orange County Palm Beach County Pinellas County

We look forward to hearing from you!

Good Moral Character Determination in a VAWA Self-Petitioner Case

ONLINE INFORMATION FORM!

How can I prove good, moral character in order to establish a prima facie case under the self-petitioning provisions of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)?

 The following may be submitted as evidence of your good moral character:

 1.Your own affidavit supported by police clearances* or records from each place you resided for at least 6 months during the 3-year period before filing your VAWA petition. If you have resided, outside the United States during this 3-year period, you must submit police clearances from those locations.

2.If police clearances, criminal background checks, or similar reports are not available for some or all locations, you should submit an explanation and submit other evidence to support your affidavit. Evidence may include affidavits from responsible persons who can knowledgeably attest to your good moral character.

 You should consult a list of  State Issued Criminal History Clearances that can assist you in obtaining police clearances from each state in the United States. Locally issued clearances may still be submitted, and are required from localities that do not offer state issued clearances.  Please note that if the police clearance is researched by name only, you must supply the law enforcement agency with all aliases you have used, including maiden and/or married name(s), if applicable.

 

If your police clearance letter or your own statement indicates that you have been arrested or charged with any crime, please submit the following:

1.   copies of the arrest report(s);

2.copies of court documents showing the final disposition of the charge(s); and

3.relevant excerpts of law for that jurisdiction showing the maximum possible penalty for each charge.

 

In addition, USCIS is not precluded from considering good moral character prior to the 3-year period when such circumstances exist.

Proving the “good moral character” requirement for VAWA self-petitioners is an important element of the petition and should not be undertaken without the help of an experienced attorney. In addition, it is very difficult for the self-petitioner to deal with these emotionally painful memories and the objective input of a compassionate attorney can make the difference in overcoming the high denial rates in these cases.

We look forward to hearing from you and discussing your case. There is no charge for an initial telephone consultation. The Law Office of Rose H. Robbins represents VAWA immigration clients from all over the United States since it involves the same Federal laws and regulations.

The Law Offices of Rose H. Robbins represents clients all over the United States and all over the world.

Call (954) 946-8130 to find out about the legal services we offer in the area of VAWA law. We do not offer a free consultation with an attorney and there is a charge for a legal consultation depending on the complexity of the matter.

ONLINE INFORMATION FORM!

* Major Florida Cities We Serve

Boca Raton Cape Coral Clearwater Deerfield Beach Ft. Lauderdale  Gainesville Hialeah Hollywood Jacksonville Lighthouse Point Miami  Miami Beach Orlando Pompano Beach Port St. Lucie St. Petersburg Tallahassee Tampa West Palm Beach

* Major Florida Counties We Serve

Broward County Duval County Hillsborough County Miami-Dade County Orange County Palm Beach County Pinellas County

We look forward to hearing from you!

How can the VAWA petitioner show abuse?

Petitioners are required to show that they were subjected by the abuser to “battery or extreme cruelty,” a term which includes a wide range of physical, mental and emotional abuse and cruelty.

Petitioners have many options for demonstrating abuse but need to document in a legally sound manner.  These steps, however, might be confusing and difficult for the petitioner because they require extensive contact with public officials and law enforcement agencies. An experienced attorney can help the petitioner focus on those sources which are most applicable and relevant to the particular situation.

The Law Offices of Rose H. Robbins represents clients all over the United States and all over the world.

Call (954) 946-8130 to find out about the legal services we offer in the area of VAWA law. We do not offer a free consultation with an attorney and there is a charge for a legal consultation depending on the complexity of the matter.

* Major Florida Cities We Serve

Boca Raton Cape Coral Clearwater Deerfield Beach Ft. Lauderdale  Gainesville Hialeah Hollywood Jacksonville Lighthouse Point Miami  Miami Beach Orlando Pompano Beach Port St. Lucie St. Petersburg Tallahassee Tampa West Palm Beach

* Major Florida Counties We Serve

Broward County Duval County Hillsborough County Miami-Dade County Orange County Palm Beach County Pinellas County

You may also fill out the “Contact an Immigration Lawyer” form below for instant delivery to our confidential email system.  The Law Office of Rose H. Robbins will contact you within twenty-four (24) business hours of receipt of this form to tell you about the legal services we offer in this area of the law. I understand that by submitting this form that the Law Office of Rose H. Robbins does not represent me and are are not my attorney and there is no attorney-client relationship by submitting my question or requesting that the Law Office of Rose H. Robbins contact me. I understand that the ONLY way that the Law Office of Rose H. Robbins will represent me is by entering into a written fee agreement/retainer agreement and that this form is not a fee agreement/retainer agreement.

We look forward to hearing from you!

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